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Piaget presents the Gouverneur Moon Phase Tourbillon

The latest SIHH event (Salon International de la Haute Horlogerie) was a perfect spot for watch-enthusiasts to view the best and newest collections worldwide. Among them, the superb Piaget Gouverneur Moon Phase Tourbillion was presented, a new version of its 1990-predecessor, boasting the thinnest-shaped tourbillion in the world.

The circle case of this exquisite piece measures 43 mm in diameter, with an oval bezel and more circles used in the center, for the dial, tourbillion and moon phase. The flying tourbillion at the top expresses the flow of time, with the “P” sign from Piaget being stamped on it.

It was actually a great accomplishment to keep the small parts of the moving mechanical piece in equilibrium, due to the asymmetric shape of the P. The tourbillion is extremely thin, measuring 2.8 mm in width and weighing 0.2 grams. Rotating once per minute, it also indicates the seconds.

The dial is silvered and boasts a sunburst guilloche design, plated with 18-carat pink gold circles and hour markers. The small moon phase indicator needs a day-correction once every 122 years, being extremely precise, finished in pink gold.

The hand-finished flying tourbillion features beveled and circular-grained titanium bridges and a circular-grained mainplate, its carriage being beveled and hand-drawn. Only 4.5 mm thick, the movement is finished with a circular Cotes de Geneve motif, with blue screws.

It beats for 21,600 an hour and holds a power reserve of 40 hours. The same movement is admirable through the sapphire crystal window in the caseback.

In addition to the pink-gold case there is also an 18-carat white gold version, its bezel being set with 128 brilliant-cut diamonds at 1.4 carats. As seen in the photos, the rows of diamonds beautifully harmonize the circle and oval shapes of the timepiece. This version features a black alligator strap, while the rose gold one a brown alligator strap.

[LuxuryBazaar]

By Richie Rich

Posted 7 Mar 2012 2:07 pm

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